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Why do I need Title Insurance?

Title insurance is an insurance policy issued by a title company. It protects the purchaser or owner, against a loss that may arise by reason of a defect in your ownership or an interest you have in real property.  There are two different types of title insurance policies available:

An Owner’s Policy of Title Insurance  and a Loan Policy of Title Insurance

Since most property owners mortgage or borrow money at the time of purchase or during ownership, the lender can be expected to request protection of its investment against loss. Lenders generally insist upon a Loan Policy of Title Insurance to protect their investment in your property. An Owner’s Policy of Title Insurance protects your investment (equity) as the buyer or owner of the property. As the owner, you should want to have the same assurance as the lender so that the investment you have made cannot be lost because of a problem or defect with the title.

Title insurance is different from other types of insurance in that it protects you, the insured, from loss that may occur from matters or defects from the past. Other types of insurance such as auto insurance, life insurance, or health insurance, cover you against losses that may occur in the future. Title insurance does not protect against a defect that may originate at a later date.

There are numerous defects or problems that can arise to cause an attack to or loss of the title to your property. Some of these include problems not disclosed by the most careful search of the public records (the title search). Hidden risks can cause a total loss of your investment or heavy legal expenses in the defense of an attack on the title. Some title problems may show up months or years after the original purchase of the property.

Here are some examples of matters that can cause loss of title or an expensive lawsuit:

Forged deeds, releases, wills, or other legal documents

Failure of spouses to join in conveyances

Undisclosed or missing heirs

Deeds from minors, aliens, or persons of unsound mind

Errors in indexing of public records  Liens for unpaid taxes including estate, inheritance, income, or gift taxes

Mistakes in recording legal documents

Wills that have not been probated

Title insurance defends you in a lawsuit attacking your title and either corrects the title problem or pays the insured’s losses up to the fact amount of the policy. The policy also protects you after you sell the property for the defects occurring prior to your ownership that cause a loss to a purchaser if the title was warranted by you.   The title policy guarantees that at the date the deed was filed for record that the title was free of defects apart from those excepted to in the policy. The policy does not guarantee an actual amount of land.

How do you obtain Title Insurance and what does it cost.. Let us know that you want to purchase an Owner’s Policy of Title Insurance and we can tell you what it will cost. The cost is based on the purchase price of the property and your policy amount must be equal to the purchase price.

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9th Camp Allen Classic Annual Golf Tournament

The Annual Camp Allen Golf Tournament was held on June 29, 2015 at the Manchester Country Club. Trombley Kfoury, P.A. is proud to be a Sponsor of this charity event.

The Camp Allen Classic proceeds will benefit campers and families. Camp Allen provides opportunities for growth, friendship and fun for children and adults with cognitive and physical challenges in an outdoor environment since 1931.

Pictured from left to right are Chris Masters, Dr. Rick Calvin and Dr. Joe Sheehan.

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What Are Equalization Rates Used For?

What Are Equalization Rates Used For?

Some states require that all municipalities value property at the same assessment-to-market value ratio. Equalization rates are used to ensure that property taxes are assessed equally and in proportion to fair market value across all municipalities.

Equalization seeks to ensure that a taxpayer in one community, whose property has a fair market value of $100,000 will pay the same taxes as a property with a fair market value of $100,000 located in another town, regardless of how those two properties are assessed.

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The Comp Blog

Stranger than truth….

I’m sure that many of you have had that odd, offbeat case from time to time. But consider these:

An Australian court ruled that a bureaucrat who was injured while having sex on a business trip was eligible for workers’ compensation benefits. Apparently, during sex, a glass light fitting was torn from its mount above the bed and landed on her face. She later suffered depression and was unable to continue to work for the government. The court reasoned that if the claimant “had been injured while playing a game of cards in her motel room, she would be entitled to compensation even though it could not be said that her employer induced her to engage in such activity….” The Court rejected government’s argument that to be compensable the employer-government would have expressly or impliedly approved of the claimant’s conduct.

Another court – this time in the United States – ruled that an employer must pay for weight loss surgery for an obese employee to ensure success for another operation for a back injury he had at work—even though his weight (340 pounds at the time of the injury) was a preexisting condition. The court determined that without the weight loss surgery, his back surgery would not be successful.

Finally, even in New  Hampshire: A woman claimed that she had bi-lateral carpal tunnel that prevented her from doing any activity with her arms, especially work. The employer sent her for an independent medical examination and, on the advice of counsel, had surveillance of the claimant to and from the doctor’s office. The claimant was videotaped getting on her Harley Davidson motorcycle, pulling it off its kickstand, and driving at a high rate of speed to the independent examination where she put on both of her arm braces. After the independent examination, she was videotaped coming out of the doctor’s office, removing her arm braces, and resuming her motorcycle ride home at a high rate of speed. The hearing officer denied the claim.

 

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Thought for the day…..

Lincoln“Discourage litigation. Persuade your neighbors to compromise whenever you can. As a peacemaker the lawyer has superior opportunity of being a good man. There will still be business enough.” A. Lincoln

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New Hampshire Workers’ Comp Costs Among Highest in the Nation

October data from the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services states that New Hampshire has the ninth-highest workers’ compensation premiums in the Nation. This is the State’s worst ranking since Oregon began publishing its figures in 1994. New Hampshire employers pay an average rate of $2.40 per $100 in payroll for workers’ compensation insurance. That is 128 percent of the national median rate of $1.88 per $100 in payroll.

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